I’m 50+ And Haven’t Worked Out In Forever: Part I

<strong>You just realized<br>you’re 50 years old<br>and haven’t worked<br>out in forever.</strong>
You just realized
you’re 50 years old
and haven’t worked
out in forever.
<strong>You just realized<br>you’re 50 years old<br>and haven’t worked<br>out in forever.</strong>

OK, so you just realized you’re 50 years old and haven’t worked out in forever.

Now what? Where do you start? This is where the panic sets in … and nothing happens.

The first thing you lose with age is your flexibility and range of motion. Add in the fact that you haven’t worked out, and I’m guessing everything feels tight – lower back, shoulders, hips and ankles to name a few (nevermind the mental slump that comes with this).

This means the first thing you have to do is restore the ranges of motion that you had when you were younger so you don’t get injured.

The main problem areas tend to be lower back, shoulders and hips. There are three simple correctives you can do daily to restore and improve ranges of motion and movement.

"Do you stop moving because you get old, or do you get old because you stop moving?"

1. Back

Thoracic Spine Rotation

  1. Lie on your right side with your right arm extended.
  2. Support your head to maintain a neutral neck position.
  3. Place a foam roller under your left knee and place your left arm over your ribs.
  4. Rotate back to the left as far as you can to that left side.

Make sure to maintain contact between your knee and the roller and keep your left arm placed over your ribs.

2. Hips

Hip CARS (Controlled Articular Rotation)

  1. Flexion - Raise your knee towards your shoulder.
  2. Abduction - Move your leg away from the midline of the spine.
  3. Internal rotation - Rotate your thigh bone inward to the midline of your body with the knee bent.
  4. Extension - Push your leg back behind you while leading with your heel.

Remember to really focus on isolating the hip joint to get the most benefit from doing these movements (avoid rounding or twisting the spine).

3. Shoulders

Scapular CARs

  1. Protract – Reach your shoulder forward.
  2. Elevate - Lift your shoulder up towards the ceiling.
  3. Retract – Move your should in towards the center of your back.
  4. Depress – Press the shoulder down towards the floor.

These are the 4 movements a shoulder is capable of doing. These movements work as a screen to see where your weaknesses may be AND a corrective to fix it!

The purpose of these correctives is to get your body ready to lift weights.

You need to get your joints in the right position to absorb and adapt to stress.

Finding the optimal position of your joints and restoring or opening ranges of motion and controlling these ranges of motion (stability) will get the ball rolling in terms of your resistance training program.

The next time you feel like you’re too old or too tired to get your body back, ask yourself – “Do you stop moving because you get old, or do you get old because you stop moving?”

Want to get started on your own? Take this test to see where you stand.

Coming Up Next: “You’ve Restored Your Range of Motion – Now What?”

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