Move of the Week: Standing Rope Fallout

Time to kick of November the only way we know how. With a new Move of the Week!

THE MOVE: Standing Rope Fallout

MOVEMENT PATTERN AND MUSCLES WORKED: Core stability; abs, shoulders, arms.

WHY DO IT: We’ve done a few things to build core stability and core strength here in Move of the Week; the most similar of those in this instance include the med ball shoulder flexion in dead bug and reverse crunch. Today, we are challenging our anti-extension capability in a new, more difficult variation.

Move of the Week: Med Ball Shoulder Flexion in Dead Bug

Today’s move is perhaps most similar to the med ball shoulder flexion in dead bug. It’s just flipped over, and it works exactly like it sounds. From a standing position with the rope in your hands, you are going to fall forward while controlling your descent. Then, you are going to pull yourself back up to a standing position. This is way harder however, because instead of working with gravity to perform the exercise, you are now working against it.

Your core will have to fight much harder in this instance to resist extension of the torso. The core must work in tandem with the shoulder, too. You have to have adequate shoulder stability to go into the shoulder flexion required in the bottom of the fallout. Otherwise, this exercise won’t look very pretty!

That being said, the difficulty of this exercise can be adjusted to suit your needs. The more upright you are in the standing position, the easier the fallout will be. Meanwhile, if you bring your feet back and put your body in a more vertical position, the harder it will be. This is similar to how the inverted row works.

Finally, using the rope also adds a nice touch. You’ve probably seen battling ropes being used in high-intensity interval circuits. We have a different use for them today. Thicker than the traditional barbells and dumbbell handles that we’re used to, the rope will challenge your grip strength and your forearms.

HOW TO DO IT: Wrap a battling rope around a pull-up bar in a squat rig, or something similar. Grab the end of the rope in both hands, and set up in a tall, standing position with your arms outstretched in front of you.

To do this exercise, brace your core, and let your body fall forward while keeping your arms straight. To do this properly, think about pushing the hips forward, not moving your arms overhead. You should be on your toes here. Control yourself as you fall forward and keep your ribs from flaring. Stop when you can’t control the extension in your core. From this bottom position, pull yourself back up. You almost want to think about doing a crunch here, without actually crunching. Repeat for reps.

Throughout this exercise, keep your body in a straight plank-like position. Once again, you can modulate the difficulty of this exercise by moving your feet backward or forward to change the angle of your body. For example, in the video above, you can see that I start with my feet back and a slight lean.

As a core-focused modality, the Standing Rope Fallout works in the beginning or end of a training session. In either instance, I would recommend using it for 3 sets of 8-10 reps. Careful though, the control required throughout this movement could leave you sore for a day or two! If you want to fire up the core, while also working on shoulder stability and grip strength, try out today’s move. Let us know what you think on Twitter or Instagram @halevylife !

by Jeremy Lau

Jeremy Lau

Jeremy Lau Halevy Life Staff CoachJeremy Lau is a Senior Staff Coach at Halevy Life.

Jeremy graduated cum laude from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering and is currently pursuing his M.Ed. in Exercise Physiology at Columbia University. In addition to his academic accolades, Jeremy is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS).

Prior to joining the team at Halevy Life, Jeremy completed a coaching internship at Cressey Sports Performance, where he coached both amateur and professional athletes, among whom were many professional MLB baseball players.

As an athlete, Jeremy has played baseball competitively for most of his life.